Mary Hope ~ a far-flung family

 
Mary Hope’s line has been traced right back to a John Hope born around 1680 in the village of Bold in the parish of Traquair, Peebeshire. This village, no longer in existence, was sited on the south bank of the River Tweed a few mils east of Walkerburn. This area is now part of the Tweed Valley Forest Park. The Forestry commission houses at Glenbenna is in the approximate location. These early Hopes were thought to be  weavers.


Map below shows the village of Bold in 1882 and to the right the Glenbenna forestry Houses today
http://www.ajbhope.net/lost-village-of-bold/shapeimage_1_link_0

John Hope had at least 3 children  - Marion and twins Charles and John, born 20th April 1701. Next in our line is Charles, then his son John born 3rd March 1793. John married Agnes Clark in November 1769. The couple lived in Selkirk where John worked as a labourer on the estates of Murray of Philiphaugh. Records show they had six children – Peggy, Janet, Joan , Mary,James and Agnes.


James, their only son, was a tailor. He married Grizzel (Grace) Somerville, born 1781 in Carnwath although her father’s family came from West Calder, which is where they settled. West Calder at that time a village some 4 miles south of Livingstone in Midlothian. This move marks the start of prosperity for the Hope family. It is likely that much of the credit goes to James’ wife, Grace, a fact borne out by the large number of her descendants bearing the name ‘Grace’ or ‘Somerville’.


James and Grace were buried in the old kirkyard in West Calder. They had seven children and a large number of descendants spread over many parts of the world.

Looking down on West Bold and Glenbenna

Left: The old Kirk in West Calder, Midlothein.

Right: The grave of James Hope and his wife Grace. The inscription reads:- Erected by James and William Hope in Memory of their Mother Grace Somerville who died in February 1857 also of their Father James Hope, Tailor West Calder, who died 7th May 1867.

James and Grace’s Family



John Hope


John was born  on 19th April1807 and named after his paternal Grandfather as was the custom. He married Flora McMurphy in 1829 and they had 1 child, Grace Hope born in1832. John worked as a baker- possibly in the bakery right next door to their home.  Both he and his wife died in their thirties and at the time of the 1841 census Grace was living with her Hope grandparents. John has descendants living in Glasgow, Australia and the USA.



Cornelius Hope


Cornelius was born on 28th September 1808 and was named after his maternal Grandfather. He trained as a tailor,presumably with his father, and after his marriage to Marion Lang moved to Kirkintilloch where he continued to work as a tailor. Cornelius and Marion had 6 children -William in1834,James 1836, Cornelius 1838 (died in infancy), John 1840, Marion 1845 and Cornelius 1847.. Young Cornelius started as an account clerk according to the 1871 census, but changed to medicine and became a surgeon – stitching up people rather than clothes!  Cornelius (1808) died in 1864. There are descendants of his living in UK, Australia and USA.


James Hope


James was born on 24th June 1810. He emigrated to Tasmani, then Van Diemen’s Land, as a young man and there he married Emma Stone. James was the trailblazer for many of his nephews and nieces who followed him out there.James and Emma had thirteen children – Agnes Kerr in 1837, John 1838(died in infancy), James Somerville 1840, Charles Alexander1842,John Thomas 1845, Margaret Anderson 1848, Mary Finlay 1851, Grace 1853, Annie 1956, Cornelius 1859, William Alfred 1861, Lucy Susannah 1863 and Emma Christine1865.

Their son James came back to Scotland for his schooling and went on to study medicine at Edinburgh University. He returned to practice in Tasmania, but sadly died of a riding accident in 1867. James died in 1890 and there are numerous descendants living in Australia, USa and New Zealand.






Left: James and Emma’s grave. Followed by 3 of their children - John Thomas, Margaret Anderson  and Cornelius

Margaret Hope


Margaret was born in 1814 and named after her maternal G-Grandmother, Margaret Anderson. She married  baker John Rowan and bore him two sons, Alexander in 1832 and James in 1834.John died in 1846. Margaret later married William Whitehead in 1850 and Francis Johnston in 1865 but had no further children. Margaret died in 1869. There are descendants in UK, USA and Australia.


Grace Somerville Hope


Grace was born in 1820. She married master baker William McNeil  in 1849, They  lived in Glasgow and had seven children – Grace in 1841, John 1844,Ellen 1845, William 1846,  Agnes 1848 (died in infancy)Mary  1849 and James in 1851. Three of her children, John, Ellen and William emigrated to Australia. Ellen moved to New Zealand so descendants are thought to be inUK, Australia and New Zealand.



William Hope


William was born in 1821. He worked with his father as a tailor and took over the business. He married Elizabeth Cunningham in 1844 and they had twelve children – Elizabeth  in 1845, Grace 1846, James 1848, Mary 1850, Alexander 1852, William 1854, Margaret 1857, John  1859, Janet 1861, Marion  1864,Cornelius 1866 and Emma 1868 (died in infancy). Four of the sons, James, William, John and Cornelius built up the tailoring business with their father. In the 1880s West Calder grew rapidly from a village into a town due to the discovery of shale oil  and the manufacture of paraffin  in central Scotland,

This family prospered and spread. William died in1893 and there are descendants in the USA, Canada and South Africa as well as the UK.




Right : William and Elizabeth’s grave in West Calder churchyard.


Mary Hope


Mary was born in 1823. She married David Telfer, a grain merchant, in 1844 and settled in Glasgow where they brought up their thirteen children. Clock on link to David Tlefer’s page to read more about Mary and David.

Mary died of heart disease in 1883. Descendants are living in UK and possibly also in Australia and Canada.




Left: Mary’s weeding tea-set  which is handed down to the youngest daughter of the family.


Acknowledgement: Grateful thanks to Tony Hope whose thorough research of the Hope family has been an invaluable source. For further information on the Hopes follow one of the links to www.ajbhope.net